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E Fleet - Past Seasons

 
 

E Fleet - 2014 Season 

 

E Fleet Captain: Mike Barnett, mike.s.barnett@gmail.com


2014 E Fleet Members:

Boat Number Boat Name Owner
H0 Hoedown
Jeff Russell/Donny Anderson
H1 Rare Pursuit Tom Blaskey
H2 E-Z Hoofer Sailing Club
H3 Shiva
Brendan/Andy/Phil
H4 Habanero Hoofer Sailing Club
H7 Mirage Lon Schoor
H8 Gr8 Expect8tions Hugh/Tim Sugar
H9 CJ Craig Jefferds
H11 Full Tilt Lance Puccio
H13 Wild Turkey Patrick Heaney
H14 Parents E-scape Emily Green/John Wenning
H19 TnT Bob Holz
H20 Ripple Mike Barnett
H23 Avanti John Rather
H36 Milwaukee Hoofer Sailing Club
H73 Remote Control Eric Kerlow
H88 Crazy Eights Phil Zalog
H111 Spendo Trey Sprinkman
H?
Your name here
 
E Fleet External Website: NCESA
 
Welcome to the season of 2014!  It is going to be another great year of E racing.  We have a few new boats joining the fun this year.  We look forward to seeing you on the water!  I'll post some updates here periodically. Thanks, Mike
Checkout the E Fleet Regatta Reports for the following news:
  •  E Blue Chip Announcement:  Bring your Opti to Pewaukee and sail with Jimmy Spithill, be part of Bart’s Bash fundraiser and world record attempt, then get his autograph and take your photo with this legendary sailor! All ages are welcome. Even if you don’t have an Opti or can’t sail, please join us for this once in a lifetime event and meet Jimmy afterwards.
  • MYC overview report from John Rather and the play-by-play report from Lon Schoor about the great 2014 Lake Geneva Spring E Regatta on May 17-18.

E Fleet - 2010 Season

 
Fleet Captains: Hugh Sugar, hughsugar gmail.com, 608-347-4884
Tim Sugar, sugartimothy gmail.com, 608-347-4884
 
             
 
2010 E Fleet Members:

Boat Number Boat Name Owner
H00 Hoedown
Jeff Russell/Donny Anderson
H2 E-Z Hoofer Sailing Club
H7 Mirage Lon Schoor
H8 Gr8 Expect8tions Hugh/Tim Sugar
H11 Full Tilt Lance Puccio
H13 Wild Turkey Patrick Heaney
H14 Parents E-scape Emily Green/John Wenning
H19
Bob Holz
H23 Avanti Andy Jackson/Barbie Stimpson
H36   Hoofer Sailing Club
H38
Mike Barnett
H88 Crazy Eights Phil Zalog
H101 Wild Thing Bill Shelton
H111 Spendo Trey Sprinkman

 
 
September 2010
 
2010 ILYA Championship Regatta Class E
by Lon Schoor
  
We arrived Wednesday afternoon to a beautiful breeze over the lake that invited a number of boats out to practice before the racing was to start on Thursday. For those that had their crews ready, sailing was the best idea. But there were a number of boats who's crew hadn't arrived or they had last minute maintenance they wanted to do on their boats. Not a good idea - the heat index had to be over 100 on the blacktop parking area.
  
It was brutal - in any other environment people would not have shown up. But this is the ILYA Championships and there was too much excitement in the air to be squelched by the sauna hot and humid air.
  
55 E-scows owners completed registration and were ready to go on Thursday. Unfortunately when Thursday came they were left sitting until 4:00 PM when the racing was officially cancelled. Oh, the lake had plenty of waves, just not a one created by a breath of air.
  
Worse yet, Wednesday's hot and humid was just a warm up for the real thing on Thursday. At the Tex Mex party that evening the talk was all about the forecast of good winds on Friday, 10-20 was often heard and was a welcome thought.
  
Friday was a difficult SE wind direction and the 10-20 ended up being more like 5-10 and that is being very generous - may be the leaders saw that velocity but the back of the fleet lumped along in 4-7. It was hard.
  
The winds started the day swinging 20-30 degrees and the first start was a pile up at the starboard end of the line where there was more pressure - General recall. On the second start there was a shift to the port end with breeze which spread the boats along the whole line since the right side for the course had looked good during the most of the time we had been out sailing.
  
In the first race Matt Peterson V-27 was first around followed by Frank Davenport I-333, Tobin Tornehl V-511, Bill Burns V-25 and Mark Unicome GL-11. And while they sailed strong, three more good sailors were making their move on the next two legs: Sam Rogers M-42 moved from 8th to 2nd, Rob Evans went from 11th to 3rd, and Derek Packard M-87 liked his 5th at the second upwind mark better the his 12th the first time up.Derek is new to E-scows this year after having a very successful taste of the asymmetrical spinnaker in the Melges-17 class.
  
Near the end of the race it was Evans following Rogers around the same leeward gate mark the last time down. Both boats stayed on starboard toward the point. When Rogers tacked so did Evans and he was able to slowly work up on Rogers. Eventually Rogers tacked away and Evans waited a bit longer for some new breeze ahead before tacking. The next time they met Evans could cross Rogers and then a tacking dual began with Evans holding Rogers off for the win. Unicome was 3rd followed by Dick Moran X-17, Petterson V-27, Packard M-87.The first race was a Windward 2 1/2 and the winner took 52 minutes to get around.
  
The fleet went in after the first race because of a threatening thunder storm and all 100 boats from both the E and MC fleet craned out. Things cleared up enough to send us out again about 1:00 with the hope of 2 races.
  
The committee was struggling with a an uncooperative wind that was moving left faster than they could reset. The race got off with boats at the leeward end most pleased with themselves, especially Jeff Solum M-12 and Sam Rogers (M-42) who jumped into the lead rouonding the top mark 1 and 2, followed by Jon Schloesser J-80, Brian Porter I-49, Will Graves V-74. The East side of the SE course continued to payout up and down the course. Peterson M-87 slowly moved up going from 7th to 6th to 3rd and holding that place until the finish. Rogers got by Solum for the win and Solum held off Peterson. Graves was 5th. Augie Barkow V-37 was off the radar at the first mark, and he clearly passed the most boats to end up 5th at the finish.Unfortunately, another thunderstorm system was approaching and the fleets were sent in for the day.
  
Race 3 was the tale of two winds. Primarily it was about 7 mph from 255 degrees, pretty much right down the lake. The wind was best on each end and spotty in the middle of the course. Brian Porter and Vincent Porter liked the favorable shift on the port end (John Porter wasn’t racing but I happen to know he liked the starboard side- sibling rivalry is alive a well), while Sam Rogers and Art Brereton liked the pressure on the starboard end and the potential of a good shift off the point. Sam Rogesr led at the first mark. Both Vincent and Brian jumped the gun at the port end but gybed around the boat to make a quick recovery rounding the first mark in the high teens.
  
From my distant vantage point it looks as though more boats from the port side rounded ahead of boats from the starboard side. For the rest of the race, that would not be the case. NCESA Commodore, Art Brereton TO-101 was second followed by Augie Barkow V-37, Kevin Jewett M-77, and David Strothman M-10. By the next upwind mark most boats had held on to their position but Jim Gluek X-137 moved up from 12th to 5th, the crew of H7, Heidi Rosenbaum and Bryan Biehl , dragged their skipper up from 30th to 11th. The north (right) shore was producing better results and most boats were playing that side of the course for the remainder of the race. Jewett got by Rogers for the win. Following Rogers was Gluek, Will Graves V-47, Rob Evans M-1, and Tom Burton had a steady climb to the top – 18th at the first mark, then 12th and finally 6th at the finish. The races was a 2 ½ windward leeward, the leg times were 16 minutes up, 10 minutes down, 14 up, 10 down and 11 up to the finish in a building breeze. I believe the legs were 1 mile long.
  
Race 4 followed immediately after race 3 using the same course. It got off at 11:33. Race 3 indicated that the starboard side (north) was the best bet to the first mark, and four Pewaukee boats showed the way – Augie Barkow led, followed by PJ Friend V-11, Will Graves, V-47, and Tobin Tornehl V-511. Tom Burton M-9 was next and Lance Puccio H-11 had his best first mark rounding in 6th place, just ahead of regatta leader Sam Rogers M-42. Augie Barkow V-37 never relinquished his lead and won the race with a comfortable margin. He was followed by Burton M-9 and Friend V-11. Rogers M-42 had his worse race of the regatta finishing all the way down in 4th place. In a day or two check here to see Sam’s blog – I am sure he’ll write more about the ILYA Championship regatta. There are always ‘givers’ and ‘takers’ in a race and this time the takers were: Gluek going from 18th to 12th, to 9th at the finish, Jewett 14-10-6, Rogers 8-5-4. The ‘givers’ were Evans 28-44-40, Tornehl 4-11-11, Puccio 6-25-25, and Brereton 13-6-11. The race 1 mile leg times were: 12 minutes up, 8 down, 11 up, 8 down, and 14 up.
 
July 2010
 
2010 ILYA E Scow Invitational
Here is Lon’s report from the third day of the E-Invite at Minnetonka.
 
Red sky at night is a sailor’s delight – and certainly this was true for the E-scow sailors at Minnetonka. The Saturday night party on the island was picture perfect. The next morning we had back-2-back races in 8-15 knots of wind in the 230 to 240 degree range.
  
Sunday had these five skippers leading the two race day: Tom Burton, followed by Chris Jewett, Rob Evans, Derek Packard and John Dennis. The two boats in the top 10 not able to keep up were Lon Schoor and Brian Porter. The end result had Rob Evans easily winning the regatta. Chris Jewett moved up from 6th to 2nd with finishes of a third and a forth, and Tom Burton moved up from 8th to 5th with finishes of a first and a fifth.
  
In Race 6, the first of back-2-back on Sunday morning, it was Woody Jewett M-77 who port tacked across the whole fleet, heading towards Bracket's Point, in a daring move he hoped would give him the lead - it almost did, as he rounded 5th, his best position in the races so far. Woodie slipped to 13th at the finish but still had a great race. The gap between the leaders and the trailers was much tighter this race than the previous 5 races because one side did not come in big as it had previously. Staying in the pressure downwind seemed especially challenging with the boats packed tight which limited opportunities to get to the breeze (at least for me and I think maybe Brian Porter based on the results). The sixth race was a W2 at 235 degrees with legs of 1.2 nautical miles and it lasted 43 minutes. Upwind legs lasted from 12-13 minutes, and the downwind legs took 9 minutes. There were some tip overs but the M-4 managed to do it twice and still finished ahead of 4 boats in the race.
  
Race 7 got off quickly after race 6 - thanks to PRO Blake Middleton and team. The race was a W 2 ½ at 230 degrees and 1.2 nautical mile legs - the winds were still about 8-15 mph. The leg times were: 12 minutes to the first mark, 10 down, 11 up, 8 down, 11 to the finish. The race lasted a total of 52 minutes for those who don't want to add those numbers up. NCESA Commodore Art Brereton TO-101 led at the first mark, followed by youth skipper Erik Bowers M-11, John Dennis M-42, and youth skipper Derek Packard M-87. The ILYA has to feel good about their efforts to promote youth entries in all the scow classes. It certainly was noticeable at this E-Invite regatta - and two finished in the top ten! In the last race youth skipper Drake Sprinkman V-50 almost (1 second early) had a perfect start at the committee boat. It's a sign that we will certainly hear his name in race reports more in the future. Again the fleet was tightly packed and there were a lot of position changes throughout the race. Brereton almost held the lead for 2 laps, but John Dennis M-42 was the spoiler as he led around the last leeward mark and covered Brereton to the finish for the victory. That gave the next boat, Erik Bowers M-11, an opportunity and he slipped by Brereton for second place, Brereton was third. Again Chris Jewett and Tom Burton were always near and they finished 4 and 5. Vincent Porter I-2 had to have a good race because his 19th in the previous race threatened his good regatta. His 6th in the last race tied him for second in regatta points but he was third after the tie breaker. Rob Evans "coasted" in for a 7th place, with almost a 20 point cushion.
  
Lon Schoor top Mendota E Boat takes 10th!
  
The Mendota E fleet traveled in mass to Green Lake for the ILYA E Scow Championships. With an armada of five boats traveling from Madison this is one of the largest group of E Scows to compete in many years
  
The strength of the Mendota E fleet was well represented with Lon Schoor finishing in 10th, Tim and Hugh Sugar in 17th, and Patrick Heaney just edging out Lance Puccio for 23rd and 24th place respectively.
  
Andy Jackson rounded up the five traveling boats with the 39th place. It's great to see this many boats participating, and representing our Mendota classes.
 

E Fleet - 2006 Season

 
Fleet Captain:  Laura Anderson, Phone 224-1214, h22Laura_earthlink.net

Boat Number Boat Name Owner
H1 Hare Tom Blaskey
H2 E-Z Hoofers Sailing Club
H7 Mirage Lon Schoor and Lance Puccio
H8 Crews Control Lon Schoor
H9 Reckless Endeavor Tom Teska
H17 Flexible Flyer Dan Fix
H22 Habanero Laura Anderson and Alyssa TenHarmsel
H23 Avanti Andy Jackson and Barbie Stimpson
H33 Warrior Todd Tiefenthaler
H38 Horizontal-E Justin Sergersten
H101 Wild Thing Bill Shelton
H111 Southern Cross Doug Rahn
H141 Driftwood Scott Stroud
H477 Hoofer Sailing Club
H838 Fubar Bill, Chris, and Jamie Hanson
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
May 24, 2006
 
MYC E-Scow Team Wins at Lake Geneva
 
  
The Lake Mendota E Scow team helmed by Lon Schoor raced to victory in a five-race series at the 2006 Lake Geneva spring regatta . The fleet of thirty five boats experienced winds ranging from 4-18 mph.
 
1st: Lon Schoor - 2nd: Rob Evans - 3rd: Ken Wruk - 4th: PJ Friend.
  
June 8, 2006
  
2006 Geneva Spring Regatta
by Lon Schoor - H7
  
Everyone comes to the regatta with some expectations of doing well. Winning isn't on everyone's list, although we secretly wish it would happen just once. Most of us are realistic and would be excited to finish with an award or just a great finish or two. After we got home from the Geneva Spring regatta and were putting the boat on the rail system for our upcoming summer racing series, a crew member said, "It doesn't feel like we won". It had only been 2-3 hours ago we got the trophy but I understood what they meant right away. The fun and excitement is really in the racing not the winning, and that's why we keep coming to many E-scow regattas year in and year out. Leading going into the last day of racing - it is natural to have a thought (as a crew member did) that maybe we will be lucky, the weather will turn bad, the races cancelled, and we can win a regatta. You can't blame them but with more experience they will understand that you should never wish away a regatta race, because after all that is what it is all about. My crew for this regatta was Heidi Rosenbaum in the middle, Miles Clark on the jib, and Laura Anderson as the fourth. It was my second regatta with Heidi and Miles (earlier we went to the Charleston Easter regatta) and my first with Laura. I felt fortunate to have them racing with me. For those curious, our crew weight was about 660 pounds, not enough sometimes and too much at other times.
  
Dierk asked me to write a regatta report and I am sorry to say I am one of those skippers that can't remember a thing about most of the races. I am talking about my own races let alone where someone else was or how they got there. I envy people who say things like PJ Friend (V-11) had a good start near the middle of the line and played the left side in the first race to catch the big left shift to lead at the weather mark. Actually it probably happened like that but I'm not really sure. For a long while, after having a great windward end start and playing the right side, I thought I would round first, but probably ended up somewhere between 3-6. As many of you know I remodeled my 1996 Melges boat to be more like Melges' new boats with the swept back spreaders, no back stays, and the foil rudders. This is my fourth regatta sailing the boat and I am finally getting used to the tuning, steering, and sheeting needed to keep the boat going fast. I love what Melges has done to the boats. They are a dream to race and their design and innovation will keep our class strong for a long time to come. By the way, I am very much in favor of the Asymmetrical sail change and believe it will eventually be approved, only making this magnificent yacht even more attractive to a broader range of people. Back to the racing, the results show PJ went on to win the first race and the second one too. That was quite an achievement considering some of the major wind shifts that occurred during the races. In the second race I had a poor leeward end start but there was a major left shift early that kept me somewhat near the leaders at the first mark. I stayed mostly left that day in winds from the 270 direction I think, and many times I thought I was a goner only to have a good shaft of wind come down just in time to keep me near the leaders at the top mark. I was being pretty patient for the wind and I could feel my crew getting anxious at times, but we had terrific boat speed and that kept us in play even when I was making poor decisions. I don't remember anything about the third race that day except we did have a good start near the weather end of the line. After the start, I am drawing a complete blank as to what happened, sorry. What I recall in general is I would have one reall y good leg each race that would get me back into the race, and if it wasn't the first leg it generally was the last - and that was fortunate. The second day of racing was a tear your hair out kind of day for me, not because we were leading going in, but that the wind was so switchy and puffy from the North that big groups of boats were changing positions thoughout the race. I never saw them on the second day but Aaron Roth (2,2) and Rob Evans (3,4) must have been psychic to achieve those finishes on the second day of racing. To give an example of what it was like for the rest of us, Ken Wruk was last (that's what he told me after the race) at the first weather mark but managed to finish the race in 14th and if it was anything like my races he probably was in the top 10 at one point too. I was up and down both races, and was lucky enough to be up near the finish. I was surprised that we actually increased our regatta lead in the first race of the second day because on that first leg it looked pretty dismal by the time we reached the weather mark. It is a time like that a skipper needs a crew to work extra hard and fight though each little defeat along the way to eventually get the big break needed to pass a large group of boats. In that first race on the second day we hooked onto a long port lift up the center of the course and had speed to burn that got us back into the race. I saw Toby Sutherland out front once and see from the results that he did win the fourth race. I should mention that I should have been covering PJ Friend, Pete Strothman, and Ken Wruk, but that is hard to do when you have a poor start and end up following most the pack to the first weather mark. After the second upwind, when we got back into the race, we were aware where they were a little but frankly the wind shifts and puffs were our main focus because we still had to have a reasonably decent finish going into the last race, otherwise Rob Evans would have been a problem in the last race since he was having a good fourth race, and you know he is going to come on strong. The last race was a repeat of the fourth with switchy puffy conditions, lots of lead changes. We had our ups and downs and had won and lost the regatta at least a half dozen times during that race. It wasn't until the last leg that we hooked into some stronger wind on the right that we started to make significant gains and managed to finish 8th. What got me most excited and what will be memorable about the regatta is that we had great boat speed and super team work, which allowed us to have consistent finishes, even if I wasn't making the brilliant decisions needed to win races.
  
Congratulations to the race winners: Peter Friend, Pete Strothman, Toby Sutherland, and Jim Gluek - and their crew.
  
You can't come away from a regatta at Lake Geneva and not envy the facilities they have to offer and the wonderful people that put so much time into making their events outstanding. This time Mary Jane and Steve Schalk organized another great regatta and I am looking forward to attending the ILYA Championships there in August.
  
Photo Credits: Tammy Sawyer
For Additional pictures, see www.tammysawyerphotography.com
  
 
 
  
Photo Credits: Lon Schoor
  
  
Left to right: Scott (H38), Keith Rosenbaum (H38), Miles Clark (H7), Trey Sprinkman (H33)
  
  
Miles, Justin Segersten (H38)
  
  
Laura Anderson (H7), Heidi Rosenbaum (H7)
  
  
Laura, Heidi, Miles, Lon [the H7 team at the trophy presentation]
  
May 1, 2006
  
Charleston Update Via Lon Schoor
  
"I don't have a report and don't recall who did well ,when, or why. But here are some racing observations I came away with:
  
The tidal current was a major factor in most of the races, and it can't be ignored. Even if it appeared it should be uniform across the course, it wasn't. I don't know anything about sailing in currents, but my guess is the depth of the water was having an affect on the speed and direction of the current.My plan was to watch the better local boats and stay in the vicinity of them for the race, which wasn't a bad plan. However, starting against an almost 2 knot current left me pretty late for the start and I ended up doing more following then staying if the vicinity of. Even when I realized I was late for the start, it was to late to do anything about it. Mark rounding were wicked and most everyone had a problem at sometime during the regatta. You can't afford to do circles because you touched a mark if you want to be winning the race, or in Burton's case, winning the regatta (he lost 5 places at the first weather mark in the windy last race). It was a learning experience to just get around them when there weren't any other boats near me, but in a crowed rounding it was tortuous. Also, boats trying to get around the mark that were finding themselves in a marginal situation at best would have an affect on a lot of boats that may have been in good shape. If it weren't for their desperate actions at the last minute to try and salvage a mark rounding, the other boats would have been okay. At the Nationals with a lot more boats, it might be a good plan to be quite conservative at the mark roundings to not get in trouble caused by other people not properly anticipating the current. On the downwind legs in a race with the current crossing the course I found myself having to keep heading up to head toward the leeward mark because the current was pushing me sideways - however as I got near the leeward mark the opposite started to happen, almost as if the current stopped or switched directions. It happened each time downwind, and I believe something piculiar was happening with the current. For many of the races, the current was such a big factor that the races were almost a follow the leader situation. You could pick different lanes, but it would be unwise to split with the leaders. The last race was windy and I struggled with a decision to chose the favored end of the line (leeward) or chose the side with the favorable current. At the start we were heading into the current. In lighter winds I definitely would chose the current advantage but in 20+ mph winds I didn't know, thinking that the boat speed might negate the difference. The eventual regatta winner, Gary Knapp, started at the favored end and was on port tack immediately heading for the favored side of the course (because of the current). I started at the opposite end of the line and went about 200 feet before tacking on to port. If I had kept going Gary would have crossed me by 100 yards! At the top of the leg when I tacked onto starboard and crossed Gary, I had him by 100 yard. Okay, maybe both distances are a little exaggerated, but the current definitely had a big affect. We had a very good lead at the first weather mark, but unfortunately when I rounded it the next time around, I broke my boom. So my last observation is, easy the vang a little as you're coming into the weather mark after overstanding a little and reaching a little - it might be fast with the vang on hard but you have to finish the race for it to count."
  
 
 

Boat Number Boat Name Owner
H0 Hoedown
Jeff Russell/Donny Anderson
H1 Rare Pursuit Tom Blaskey
H2 E-Z Hoofer Sailing Club
H3 Shiva
Brendan/Andy/Phil
H4 Habanero Hoofer Sailing Club
H7 Mirage Lon Schoor
H8 Gr8 Expect8tions Hugh/Tim Sugar
H9 CJ Craig Jefferds
H11 Full Tilt Lance Puccio
H13 Wild Turkey Patrick Heaney
H14 Parents E-scape Emily Green/John Wenning
H19 TnT Bob Holz
H20 Ripple Mike Barnett
H23 Avanti John Rather
H36 Milwaukee Hoofer Sailing Club
H73 Remote Control Eric Kerlow
H88 Crazy Eights Phil Zalog
H111 Spendo Trey Sprinkman
H?
Your name here
 
Boat Number Boat Name Owner
H1 Hare Tom Blaskey
H2 E-Z Hoofers Sailing Club
H7 Mirage Lon Schoor and Lance Puccio
H8 Crews Control Lon Schoor
H9 Reckless Endeavor Tom Teska
H17 Flexible Flyer Dan Fix
H22 Habanero Laura Anderson and Alyssa TenHarmsel
H23 Avanti Andy Jackson and Barbie Stimpson
H33 Warrior Todd Tiefenthaler
H38 Horizontal-E Justin Sergersten
H101 Wild Thing Bill Shelton
H111 Southern Cross Doug Rahn
H141 Driftwood Scott Stroud
H477   Hoofer Sailing Club
H838 Fubar Bill, Chris, and Jamie Hanson